Britta Stanton Comments on Restaurant’s Tattoo Ban for Channel 11 News

Britta Stanton Comments on Restaurant’s Tattoo Ban for Channel 11 News

A Dallas restaurant’s dress code that prohibits serving customers with visible neck or face tattoos is drawing complaints, but Lynn Pinker Cox & Hurst partner Britta Stanton says the business is likely well within its rights.  In an interview with CBS 11 News, Stanton says people with tattoos aren’t considered a “protected class” under the U.S. anti-discrimination law, and restaurants and bars are free to apply any dress code they would like. Restaurant must enforce the dress code evenly to all races or other protected classes.  “The line can be very gray as to when it gets discriminatory,” she says. “It’s easy to hide behind a dress code to unfairly target someone. And so the Department of Justice takes that seriously.” But many establishments have dress codes, and they seldom are discriminatory or cause a problem.  In the report an attorney for the restaurant, Little Woodrow’s, said the policy is not a ban on ink, but the business would just prefer not to serve clients with neck or face tattoos. View the full report here.